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Rory McIlroy insists ‘common sense has prevailed’ after judge rules against LIV Golf trio

Rory McIlroy insists 'common sense has prevailed' after judge rules against LIV Golf trio

Rory McIlroy claimed common sense prevailed when he welcomed a federal judge’s decision to rule against three LIV Golf players who filed for temporary restraining orders (TRO) to allow them to make the playoffs of the FedEx Cup to contest.

Talor Gooch, Matt Jones and Hudson Swafford had sought a TRO to allow them to play in the playoffs, starting with the St Jude Championship on Thursday, following the PGA Tour’s decision to suspend them after they were joined the LIV Golf Series.

Judge Beth Labson Freeman said Gooch, Swafford and Jones were “well aware of the ramifications” of their actions in participating in LIV events without authorization and that they had not “pled their plea” against being suspended from the PGA Tour as a result. .

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The trio were stripped from the playing field for this week’s event in Memphis, Tennessee, the first of three playoff events with the winner pocketing a cool $18 million.

At a pre-tournament press conference, McIlroy, 33, said: “From my point of view, common sense prevailed and I thought it was the right decision.

“Then we can just focus on the important things, which is golf. We can all move forward and will no longer have that side issue in the coming weeks, which is nice.’

Rory McIlroy welcomed a federal judge’s decision to rule against three LIV Golf players who filed for temporary restraining order, claiming ‘common sense had prevailed’

Talor Gooch (left with Donald Trump), Matt Jones and Hudson Swafford had sought a TRO to allow them to play in the FedEx Cup playoffs of the PGA Tour, which begin this week in Tennessee

Talor Gooch (left with Donald Trump), Matt Jones and Hudson Swafford had sought a TRO to allow them to play in the FedEx Cup playoffs of the PGA Tour, which begin this week in Tennessee

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Gooch, Jones and Swafford are also three of ten players – formerly 11 before Mexico’s Carlos Ortiz withdrew his name – who have filed an antitrust lawsuit against the PGA Tour.

The LIV Golf rebels have been banned from the PGA Tour after jumping to the rival series, claiming they will be punished for playing in the breakaway tournaments.

Among the plaintiffs are American stars Phil Mickelson and Bryson DeChambeau and McIlroy’s former Ryder Cup teammate Ian Poulter.

The Northern Irishman is one of the most vocal opponents of the Saudi-funded breakout.

He, along with Justin Thomas, welcomed the Tour’s decision to suspend players after the inaugural LIV event in June, insisting Commissioner Jay Monahan was just “by the book.”

Phil Mickelson (pictured) and Bryson DeChambeau are among 11 LIV Golf players to file an antitrust lawsuit against the PGA Tour

Bryson DeChambeau and Co Claim Their Suspensions Threatened Their Careers

Phil Mickelson (left) and Bryson DeChambeau (right) are among LIV Golf players filing antitrust suit against PGA Tour after being banned for breakaway series

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McIlroy has now admitted that the ongoing battle between the PGA Tour and the Saudi-backed breakout is “a little more personal”.

He added: “What I would say is I definitely have a little more respect for the guys who didn’t put their name on the suit.

“Guys are going to make their own decisions that they think are best for them and that’s totally fine. I don’t begrudge anyone to play LIV and take guaranteed money.

“I think where the resentment comes from is the fact that they want to try and get back in here with no consequences. Anyone who has read the PGA Tour handbook or follows the rules and regulations would feel very unfair to him.”

Judge Freeman said a trial over the antitrust case could begin in August 2023 at the earliest.

The plaintiffs include former Ryder Cup teammate of Northern Irishman Ian Poulter (right)

The plaintiffs include former Ryder Cup teammate of Northern Irishman Ian Poulter (right)

McIlroy insisted there is “such a long way to go” in the ongoing battle between the two golf circuits, but admitted the PGA Tour was victorious from the first round.

“There’s still such a long way to go,” McIlroy said. “It’s like making a birdie on the first hole and you have 17 holes to go, but yesterday was a good day for the Tour and the majority of members.”

McIlroy will play in the first playoff event in Memphis, Tennessee on Thursday and is currently sixth in the FedEx Cup standings.

The trio seeking the TRO had qualified for the event at TPC Southwind, finishing in the top 125 players in the FedEx Cup standings – Gooch was 20th, Jones was 65th and Swafford was 67th – before their suspension.

McIlroy Admits PGA Tour Victory Out Of Round One Against LIV Golf

McIlroy Admits PGA Tour Victory Out Of Round One Against LIV Golf

However, the PGA Tour will now allow players outside of the top 125 in the rankings to compete and take the place of those associated with LIV Golf.

Judge Freeman said the potential loss of revenue from the FedEx Cup playoffs had been taken into account when the players signed their LIV contracts.

It appears to the court that the LIV contracts, which were negotiated by the players and concluded between the parties, were based on the players’ calculation of what they would leave behind and the amount the players would have to earn to offset those losses. ,” Freeman said in quotes reported by SI.com.

“I agree with the defendants that those losses were well known to the players at the time and clearly cashed in.

The judge said that Gooch, Jones and Swafford were 'aware of the consequences' of participating in LIV Golf

The judge said that Gooch, Jones and Swafford were ‘aware of the consequences’ of participating in LIV Golf

“And in fact the evidence shows that it seems almost beyond doubt that they will earn more than they have earned and could reasonably have expected to earn in a reasonable amount of time under the PGA (Tour).”

In response, LIV Golf issued a brief statement saying: “We are disappointed that Talor Gooch, Hudson Swafford and Matt Jones are not allowed to play golf.

“Nobody benefits from banning golfers from playing.”

Players were reportedly concerned about the threat of suspension from the PGA Tour before the series launched.

Messages from Spanish golfer Sergio Garcia, who joined the breakout, to Greg Norman, CEO of LIV Golf, emerged as part of the lawsuit in which the 2017 Masters champion claimed that players were “in their pants”.

“I just wanted to see how the League is doing because it seems like a lot of those guys who loved it and were excited about it last week are now shitting their pants,” Garcia said. on February 11, as revealed by golf magazine.

LIV Golf member Sergio Garcia expressed concern about joining the breakaway series

He Whatsapped LIV Golf Chief Greg Norman

Messages between Sergio Garcia (L) and LIV Golf CEO Greg Norman (R) have been revealed

Garcia stated that some stars were 'in their pants' because they were banned from the PGA Tour

Garcia expressed concern that some 'younger' players were successfully 'scared' by the PGA Tour

Garcia stated that some stars were ‘in their pants’ because they were banned from the PGA Tour

Norman replied, “Tomorrow. Everything is going very well. I didn’t hear the white noise of fucking their pants. Who are you referring to so I can do a check?’

Garcia expressed concern that some of the ‘younger’ players had been successfully ‘scared’ by the PGA Tour.

“If you have names I can contact them,” Norman replied.

“As for the Tour, if they banned players, they would have already done so. They know they can’t take action beyond verbal threats. If you can get them or any player threatened to get it [in writing] fantastic. Thank you.’

Major players are and continue to be enticed from the long-established tours by the ridiculous sums of money on offer, with the break backed by $2 billion in Saudi money and the total prize pool across eight events of around £205 million.

British Open winner Cameron Smith has refused to deny signing a $100M LIV Golf deal

British Open winner Cameron Smith has refused to deny signing a $100M LIV Golf deal

Newly crowned Open champion Cameron Smith is the latest to be linked to the series.

However, the Australian refused to deny that he signed a $100 million deal to join LIV Golf.

At a belated press conference ahead of the start of this week’s FedEx Cup playoffs, Smith was questioned about his future plans.

“My goal here is to win the FedEx Cup playoffs. That’s all I’m here for. I have no comment on that,” he said.

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