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England v South Africa: first Test, day two – live! | England v South Africa 2022

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Key events

“So,” says Nick, “will England manage to crack 150? Playing suicidal attacking cricket with such a long tail seems like a bizarre approach!”

Narrator: Most of them got out with defensive shots.

“Good morning from Chiswick,” says Ed, “where the weather is hopeful for a full day of cricket. I’m looking forward to seeing Anderson and Broad scurry for half an hour this morning before removing SA’s top five for awkward squats.”

Well, Broad is a walloper, and he’s just been on telly saying this isn’t a pitch to “poke and poke” because there’s going to be “a ball with your name on it” soon. But I’m not so sure about Anderson – it’s been a while since he had contact with his inner slogger.

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Correction! There will be no games at 10:30 am. According to a tweet from Lord’s itself, the start is at 11am BST. Sorry for misleading you. Cricket, like God, moves in mysterious ways.

The blankets are off! And the commentators are wearing red for the Ruth Strauss Foundation. Paired with black pants, in the case of Ian Ward and Mike Atherton, while Mel Jones and Andrew Strauss go for the full scarlet suit. I have to say, it works better for her than it does for him – but respect to Sir Andrew and his boys for the money they’ve raised and the way they’ve turned a sad loss into something so uplifting. If you feel a donation coming on, go here.

Mel Jones, Ian Ward, Andrew Strauss, Kumar Sangakkara, Michael Atherton and Mark Butcher pose in their Red For Ruth coats before the start of the match on day two.
Mel Jones, Ian Ward, Andrew Strauss, Kumar Sangakkara, Michael Atherton and Mark Butcher pose in their Red For Ruth coats before the start of the match on day two. Photo: Gareth Copley/Getty Images

Send us your opinion

This is not a public comment – only the Guardian can see your post. Our writers will monitor these posts and respond to some in the live blog, but unfortunately they won’t be able to respond to every post.

You must be 18 years of age or older to complete this form. We only use this data to improve our live blogs. For more information, please read our terms of service and privacy policy.

If you want to share something sensitive with us, feel free to contact The Guardian.

By submitting your message, you agree to share your information with us, which we can use in this blog.

Preamble: all or nothing

Good morning everyone and welcome to the second day of a series that has already proved gripping (as well as dripping). We start today with a quiz question. What comes next in this sequence: 136, 162, 71, 106, 114?

The answer is… 0. That’s what Jonny Bairstow scored yesterday, when the purple patch of his long test career was rudely interrupted by a quick straight from Anrich Nortje. One minute you’ll earn 589 for three times, the next you’ll be escorted off the field by Daddles the duck.

Amazon’s All Or Nothing is the right title in the wrong sport. The Arsenal season covered in the final series wasn’t all or nothing – they finished fifth in the Premier League, just as expected – with nearly every batter in world cricket all the time on the all-or-nothing rollercoaster sit. Immediately before his 136, Bairstow made seven consecutive scores under 30. His Test average this year, when England goes to work, is 7.33. When England win the toss and the field, it is 121.33.

The cape Bairstow couldn’t find yesterday was worn by Ollie Pope, who looked more like a senior player than ever before. He was busy but not hectic, positive but not reckless, carefree but not indifferent. He hit just four quarters out of 87 balls, but still managed to hit a hit rate of 70. He resumed this morning, at 61 not out, as England’s last hope of a respectable total.

The South Africans won’t worry about Pope unless he doubles his number. Their batting speed was phenomenal: six wickets in 32 overs. Kagiso Rabada takes fewer balls to fire a batter than any bowler in history with 150 Test wickets. Marshall, Cummins, Trueman, Garner: all a maestro, but none as good, by this measure, as the mighty Rabada. Yesterday he surgically removed England’s openers, then took a break and watched Nortje tear down the middle order. This morning they can open together and race to a place on the honorary board.

The game kicks off at 10:30 a.m. BST, weather permitting, to make up for some of yesterday’s lost time. Stay with us – it’s unlikely to get boring.

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