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Dicing with death: Desperate selfie-takers gamble against 60mph winds as Hurricane Ian hits

Desperate selfie-takers for the shot were filled with death as they headed toward the choppy waves battered by Hurricane Ian along Key West Pier in Florida.

Video shows people – including children – braving choppy water armed with phone cameras and a selfie stick as winds of up to 60 mph hit the switches.

Reckless snappers were ‘doing it for the ‘gram – doing things for the sole purpose of posting on Instagram – even as local police urged residents to stay indoors and Florida Governor Ron DeSantis warned residents in the hurricane’s path that ‘now’ is your last chance. to evacuate.

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The Key West Police Department has warned that it is not safe to get out of the house and that lives are threatened due to standing water that can be electrified by downed power lines.

A separate video showed palm trees battered by high winds and homes with no electricity submerged for two feet in Key West.

Governor Ron DeSantis said this morning that Ian is scheduled to make landfall in Charlotte County on Florida’s southwest coast, possibly as a Category 5 storm.

Ian, who was recently upgraded to a catastrophic Category 4 hurricane, was battering at 155 mph, just below the strength of a Category 5 hurricane, according to the US National Hurricane Center in Miami.

The selfie-takers risked 60 mph winds to get up close and personal with the choppy waves battered by Hurricane Ian.

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A couple poses together for a selfie under dangerous stormy conditions along Key West Pier in Florida

A couple poses together for a selfie under dangerous stormy conditions along Key West Pier in Florida

Couple armed with a selfie stick smile as they do it for the gram, defying police warnings to stay home

Couple armed with a selfie stick smile as they do it for the gram, defying police warnings to stay home

Previous estimates of maximum wind speeds of 130 mph have now been exceeded. They added that the hurricane is centered 75 miles west-southwest of Naples, Florida and is moving north at a forward speed of 10 mph (17 kph).

The massive hurricane triggered warnings of deadly winds, flooding and a potential storm of up to 16 feet along the state’s densely populated Gulf Coast from Bonita Beach to the Tampa Bay area.

Florida residents hurried to climb into their homes, hide their valuables on the upper floors and flee.

Two people have already been hospitalized after a tornado hit an apartment building for people over 55 in Kings Point, Delray Beach, on Tuesday evening.

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Large trees were thrown to the ground as parts of the building were completely destroyed and raised as residents were evacuated as the hurricane struck.

Another hurricane hit southeast Florida, with rain falling and footage recorded showing a flooded parking lot as palm trees swayed in strong winds.

Damage is expected to reach $45 billion as the storm continues to grow, with more than 2 million fluorides urged to evacuate.

Satellite images show that Hurricane Ian began to make landfall over southwest Florida after bombing Cuba.  Recent data indicates that Ian is rapidly ramping up with sustained winds now reaching 155 mph

Satellite images show that Hurricane Ian began to make landfall over southwest Florida after bombing Cuba. Recent data indicates that Ian is rapidly ramping up with sustained winds now reaching 155 mph

Satellite image shows Tropical Hurricane Ian over Cuba yesterday at 11:51 UTC

Composite image of Hurricane Ian to hit Florida hours later

These two satellite images show the progress of Hurricane Ian as it passes over Cuba on its way to the west coast of Florida

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis said Tuesday that there have already been at least two “radar-reported hurricanes” in the state, and warned those in hard-hit areas that “the evacuation time is nearing its end.”

‘You need to evacuate now. You’ll start to feel the effects of this storm relatively soon.

The major hurricane has sparked warnings of a potentially dangerous storm surge of up to 12 feet, killer winds and flooding along the state’s densely populated Gulf Coast from Bonita Beach to the Tampa Bay area. Florida residents hurried to climb into their homes, hide their valuables on the upper floors and flee.

More than 17,000 people were without power in Florida Wednesday morning, even before Hurricane Ian made landfall.

The Florida Power and Light Company has reported 17,255 outages in several counties in Florida, NBC News reports. In Broward, there were more than 6,700 outages while in Miami-Dade there were 5,700 outages.

DeSantis, who declared a statewide emergency on Sunday, has 30,000 workers on standby to help once Florida’s power grid inevitably collapses due to Ian’s wrath.

“It’s a big storm, it’s going to cause a lot of water to flow when it enters,” DeSantis said at a news conference in Sarasota, a port city of 57,000 in the forecast path of the storm. “This is a kind of life-threatening storm,” he warned.

A man walks off the beach before Category 4 Hurricane Ian arrives in Fort Myers, Florida

A man walks off the beach before Category 4 Hurricane Ian arrives in Fort Myers, Florida

News reporters film a final broadcast before the final evacuations as a potential Category 5 storm approaches

News reporters film a final broadcast before the final evacuations as a potential Category 5 storm approaches

Florida’s governor warned residents to prepare for the impact, especially those living in mobile homes along the West Coast, which may be designed for Category 3 hurricanes and 100-mph winds, but may not be able to withstand what’s to come.

“You have it in southwest Florida, really all over the state, but really in all the communities that might get the initial impact of the eye of the storm, you have a lot of mobile homes,” DeSantis said.

“You have people, and the way it’s done, they can actually withstand 100 mph winds, maybe 110 to get certified.

Expect heavy rain, strong winds, flash floods, storms, and even scattered tornadoes. Make preparations now,” he said, adding that residents should expect power outages, fuel cuts and even evictions in certain areas.

The announcement came after DeSantis earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 counties in his state, as President Biden over the weekend invoked the Everglades’ emergency ordinance, delaying a scheduled trip to Fort Lauderdale and Orlando.

Those orders have so far seen nearly 2.5 million Florida residents ordered to evacuate, as officials scramble to prepare for the now inevitable storm landing in the US — with the situation in Cuba serving as a stark warning of what might come.

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