Health

Date With Adult Model Leads to Testicular Cancer Diagnosis

A former health professional now pursuing a career in adult entertainment helped one of her regulars with a cancer diagnosis after urging him to be examined by a doctor.


Belle Grace

Belle Grace has worked with children and adults diagnosed with autism for 7 years. But during the COVID-19 pandemic, she, like many other people, started looking around for alternative income streams.

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In May 2020, Grace created a profile on the adult content subscription site OnlyFans.

“I took some time off work and found myself on OnlyFans as a bit of an afterthought,” said Grace. “It wasn’t until I started earning five times more than my standard wage that I decided to go full-time and make that career switch.”

She quickly built a regular clientele with intimate video chats.

While video chatting with one of her loyal subscribers, Grace noticed something different about his testicles. Hesitantly, she said one testicle was a lot bigger than the other — a change she hadn’t noticed before during their 2 years of interaction.

Grace says she was nervous to bring up the topic with her subscriber. She suggested he see a doctor to have his testicles checked, but her date didn’t go through right away.

Grace says he waited a few months to go for a checkup because he was a little embarrassed. When he finally went to the doctor, he was diagnosed with testicular cancer.

Although Grace says the conversation with her subscriber was a little awkward, she’s glad she mustered the courage to bring it to his attention.

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Testicular cancer is relatively rare, but it usually has a good prognosis — its survival rate is about 95%, according to Alexander Kutikov, MD, a professor of surgical oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. Testicular cancer is relatively rare, but it usually has a good prognosis — its survival rate is about 95%, according to Alexander Kutikov, MD, a professor of surgical oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

Kutikov emphasized that men should not wait if they notice changes in their genitals. The sooner they see a doctor, the better the outcome will be if it turns out to be something serious.

For testicular cancer, “treatment can be much simpler if caught early — avoid chemotherapy and avoid major surgery,” Kutikov said.

“But even testicular cancers that happen after they’ve spread can be cured. So a delay isn’t optimal, but it’s not as devastating as some other cancers,” he added.

Most men diagnosed with testicular cancer present after noticing changes in the scrotum, where one testicle feels and looks different from the other, Kutikov noted. In addition, there is usually a very firm mass or lump that can be felt under the skin.

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“Another common symptom is back pain, because testicular cancer can also go to the lymph nodes in the back,” he said.

Kutikov says it all comes down to being aware of your body and noticing big changes.

Grace suggests that sexual intimacy offers an opportunity to notice physical changes, “because you and your sexual partner can see each other’s bodies in the most intimate matter.”

“People should tell their partners if they notice any changes,” she says, for example, on their skin, such as sores or rashes, or lumps under the skin. “Even a change in a mole can be vital to your partner’s health,” she said.

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